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Berkeley Haas Case Series

Featured Cases


Sustainability Through Open Innovation: Carlsberg and the Green Fiber Bottle
The famous Danish brewery used an open innovation approach in the development of its new sustainable Green Fiber Bottle. (more)


Innovation, Co-Creation, and Design Thinking: How Salesforce's Ignite Team Accelerates Enterprise Digital Transformation
The Salesforce Ignite team designs custom software for enterprise customers by focusing intently on user needs. (more)


BAYCAT: How a New Hybrid Nonprofit Model is Creating Sustainability and Driving Social Change
This hybrid nonprofit provides disadvantaged youth with the skills to get a job in media production. The organization also runs its own professional media studio, with many clients from the Fortune 500. (more)


Burning Man: Moving from a For-Profit to a Nonprofit, the Ultimate Act of Gifting
Each year, an expanse of Black Rock Desert is transformed into a vibrant temporary city. This case focuses on Burning Man as an organization, and the decision to adopt a nonprofit structure. (more)


The Berkeley Haas School of Business: Codifying, Embedding, and Sustaining Culture
Dean Richard Lyons developed a new culture initiative at the Haas School of Business centered around the school's defining principles. (more)



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Resilience at InterMune: A Journey Through the Valley of the Shadow of Death

by Homa Bahrami

This case study is about a California-based biotechnology company that has experienced many ups and downs throughout its 17-year history. Despite many setbacks, it ultimately succeeded in developing and getting approval for an orphan drug used to treat IPF, a deadly lung disease. InterMune was acquired by Roche/Genentech for $8.3 billion in September 2014; the price represented a significant premium over InterMune’s trading price at the time. The protagonist, InterMune’s CEO, Dan Welch, joined the company in 2003 and has led InterMune through numerous strategic pivots, leadership changes, clinical trial disappointments, multiple divestitures, and ultimately the sale of the company.

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